The wartime girls.

Vrouwen in de Tweede Wereldoorlog


Grandmother of Duchess of Cambridge was working at Bletchley Park during the war

As a young girl, the Duchess of Cambridge would often ask her paternal grandmother: “Granny, what did you do in the war?”
Recently Kate Middleton found out that her grandmother worked at Bletchley Park. The house where the famous Enigma-machine was decoded. When the Duchess of Cambridge visited Bletchley Park, she met Miss Marion Body, who was a colleague of her grandmother. Both women were witnesses when the message came in that Japan had surrendered. Valerie Glassborow, as the grandmother of the Duchess was called, worked together with her twinsister for Y Service at Bletchley.

The Telegraph has published an interesting article about this discovery and the wartime of Valerie Glassborow . Read more on:

www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/kate-middleton/10910188/Duchess-of-Cambridge-learns-grandmothers-wartime-past.html

Advertenties


Dame Vera Lynn breaks chart record aged 97 with album of wartime hits

She was a very populair singer in World War II, Dame Vera Lynn. Especially with the troops which led to her nickname “Sweetheart of the Voices”. But today it turns out she is still populair with the public as her album proves. At the moment Vera Lynn has reached number 13 in the chart with Vera Lynn: National Treasure – The Ultimate Collection.

The album includes more than 40 tracks, including We’ll Meet Again and The White Cliffs Of Dover, and has now beaten the likes of Pharrell, the Arctic Monkeys and rapper 50 Cent whose new album missed out on the top 20.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/music/music-news/

We'll_Meet_Again_-_The_Very_Best_of_Vera_Lynn


The women reporters determined to cover World War Two

Women correspondents accredited by the US Army: Mary Welsh, Dixie Tighe, Kathleen Harriman, Helen Kirkpatrick, Lee Miller, and Tania Long

Women correspondents accredited by the US Army: Mary Welsh, Dixie Tighe, Kathleen Harriman, Helen Kirkpatrick, Lee Miller, and Tania Long

“It is necessary that I report on this war,” writer Martha Gellhorn fumed in an angry letter to military authorities. She was not the only one. Gellhorn was one of many female war correspondents. Together with other women like Margaret Bourke White and Therese Bonney the coverder the war for the people at home. Some with pen and paper, others with their camera’s. They were even present at D-Day in Normandy and joined the American Army all the way to Berlin.

BBC-Chief international correspondent Lyce Doucet wrote a good article about these women reporters: www.bbc.com/news/magazine